Tag: Budget

Why You’re Overspending (And How to Stop)

Compare your monthly income with your monthly spending. Do you notice a glaring discrepancy? Are your earnings in the red? Can’t figure out how you spent hundreds on groceries? You aren’t alone. Overspending is easy to do, and purchases can accumulate in the blink of an eye. Here are some reasons why you’re overspending and advice on how to stop.

You’ve fallen into a bad habit

Do you buy lunch at the deli down the street every day? This is just one example of a bad spending habit. It may be comfortable and convenient to make a daily or weekly purchase, but ten dollars per day, five days a week, four weeks a month equals $200 each month just for lunch. 

The best way to remedy a bad spending habit is to ease yourself out of the habit. For the lunch example, try packing a meal most days each week, and only go out once a week or so as a special treat. You don’t have to quit anything cold-turkey, and easing yourself towards a better spending habit might inspire you to be more mindful of what you buy.

You ignore automatic payments

This one is easy to notice, especially if you subscribe to magazines and newspapers that clog your mailbox. Still, with the rise of streaming services and other digital subscriptions, you may not be keeping track of all the services you subscribe to. It’s easy to let automatic monthly payments slip through the cracks, but those payments are also an easy way to lose money.

Each month, carefully study your credit card statement. Write down the names of subscriptions you used during the month, whether that means watching a movie on Netflix or flipping through a copy of Sports Illustrated. Next to that list, write down the subscriptions you didn’t use. Unsubscribe from the ones that you didn’t touch. You’d be surprised how much money you can save annually just by paring down your subscriptions.

You haven’t disciplined your spending habits

It’s hard to find someone who hasn’t disciplined their spending habits. Whether you fall victim to impulse buys at the checkout line or fill your gas tank before it hits the halfway mark, everyone has a spending vice. 

No two people have the same income, interests, and habits, which can make disciplining your spending habits difficult. The key is to figure out what you’re buying and why you’re buying it. It helps to break purchases up into categories, such as “loans,” “food,” and “entertainment.” Not only will this show how much you’re spending, but it will also reveal what exactly you’re spending your money on.

3 Things to Consider Before Investing in Stocks

As an increasing number of books, websites, and apps introduce the stock market to the general public, more people find the stock market to be accessible. Even though software and guides have streamlined the process, adequate research is essential for anyone hoping to get into the stock game. It’s crucial to keep numbers in mind, but nuggets of advice are equally important. Whether you’re a first-time investor or seasoned stock aficionado, the following three tips are important to keep in mind.

You have to set goals

Throwing your cash in random directions and hoping something sticks is the exact opposite of what a good investor should do. Look into the industries that interest you and seek out key players and up-and-coming competitors. Then, develop a strategy by deciding how much money you’ll invest total, and how much each investment will be. It’s best to start simple if you don’t have much investing experience, which means you should stick to regular investments and establish a well-researched foundation. Once you’ve started that foundation, give yourself a timeframe before you check on those stocks again—as you’ll see in the next section, obsessing over the numbers is going to hinder you.

You have to keep a level head

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett has maintained for years that the buy-and-hold strategy is the best option for any investor. Real-time updates cause dramatic fluctuations to the stock market. While sudden drops in stock rates are worrisome, a goal-focused investor should be safe, even if rates are down. This is especially key in the short-term, as split-second decisions can be dangerous for the success of an investor’s stock portfolio. A volatile market is one in which long-term negative changes come into play. A short-term downturn is not necessarily a cause for alarm.

You have to diversify your investments

Don’t just invest in a bunch of businesses from one industry. Check out a few industries and businesses of interest to you, and ask yourself whether they fit in with your overall goals and budget. A diverse portfolio reduces the overall effect of a downturn on your portfolio. This may not be doable early into your investing journey, but as your portfolio grows and your investing confidence improves, diversification is going to be important.

Strategies for Quick Debt Repayment

John J Bowman Jr - Debt Repayment

It’s a warm Saturday afternoon, and you’ve decided that you deserve a day out on the town with your friends. You’re exhausted and burned out from a too-long work week, sick of the grind and needing a break. You’ve been so thoughtful lately, you think, minding your budget, that you deserve to splurge a little. You hit the mall with a gaggle of friends and start swiping; more than a few bag handles circle your wrists as you reach for your credit card to pay for overpriced popcorn and soda at the complex’s theatre. You haven’t gotten your paycheck yet, but that’s okay – you know that your credit will cover you for now. When you check your banking app the next day, though, you can’t quite believe the number that blinks up at you. How can your credit balance be so high?

 

Sometimes, using a credit card to cover purchases can feel like playing with Monopoly money. We spend and spend and spend, knowing that we don’t have to pay back our debt right now. The fact that the money will need to be paid back at some point is a concern for later…until later rolls around to the present, and we face a veritable mountain of debt. According to a 2017 nerdwallet study on household debt, the average American consumer owes $15,983 in credit card debt. Totaled across the nation, that’s $931 billion owed by US consumers. Paying off this debt is an intimidating endeavor, but not an impossible one. Here, I provide a few strategies for a quick and efficient debt repayment.

 

Put the Cards Down

If you want to lower the mountain, why would you add to its height? Stop using your credit cards, and avoid making purchases that would add to your overall balance. Steering clear of credit for a few days or weeks might help you keep better tally of how much you actually spend in a day; the dues feel dearer when you have to pay them immediately, rather than at some hazy later date.

 

Revisit Your Budget

Take a closer look at your current budget! Can you trim any of your costs? Be tough but fair with yourself; you probably don’t need Netflix, Hulu, and HBOGo. Being on a budget doesn’t require you to give up all entertainment, but treating yourself should only go so far. Once you have a pared-down budget, you can start crunching the numbers and make an estimate of how much you can afford to apply towards your debt each month. Remember, paying off your balance now will greatly decrease what you pay in interest later!

 

Pick Up a Side Hustle

Trimming a budget can only go so far. In the end, you’ll make more from a part-time job or side hustle than you would ever save by canceling subscriptions or couponing. Find a money-making gig that can fit with your schedule!

 

Apply Unexpected Income Sources Towards Your Balance

It can be tempting to splurge when you find yourself with an unexpected windfall. However, the money you spend on luxuries now could be handicapping your ability to pay for more basic needs later. Put bonuses, inheritances, and tax refunds towards paying off your debt! Once you live debt-free, you will be able to afford splurging now and again.

 

Be Consistent

Debt repayment won’t happen unless you hold yourself to a firm budget and repayment schedule. Be consistent! As much as it might hurt to pass on dinners out or afternoons at the mall, your debt-free future self will be much happier and more financially secure for your efforts.

 

4 Valentine’s Day Gifts That Won’t Break Your Budget

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner! With all the dinner, card, and gift options available, it is quite possible to blow your budget if you aren’t properly prepared. Whether you’re on a strict budget or tired of wasting money on gifts that will be forgotten about months later, here are some meaningful gifts that will give you the most bang for your buck:

Wine Anyone?
What better way to enjoy some alone time together than having a wine tasting date night. The best part is most wineries and breweries offer discounted tickets or free (yes, FREE) wine tasting events all year long. Check out your local wineries and breweries and see what they have to offer.

Pro tip: It may be difficult to get tickets for Valentine’s day, so try surprising your loved one with a surprise date on or before the holiday.

Home-cooked Meal
Valentine’s Day is one of the most difficult holidays to make dinner reservations for. Many restaurants increase the price menu items and may require you make a reservation weeks, months, or even a year in advance. Skip a crowded restaurant and make your significant other a home-cooked meal.

The two of you can make the night even more memorable by choosing a meal neither one of you have made before and cook the Valentine’s Day meal together.

Get Crafty
Fancy greeting cards are all the rage on Valentine’s Day, but do you really need an overpriced piece of paper to express your love? No. Why not try stopping by your local craft store, gather some supplies, and create a personal card that will touch your loved one’s heart.

Sweet tooth Solutions
A wise man once said, “life is like a box of chocolates -you never know what you’re gonna get”. While this remains true, a box of chocolate is another overpriced item during the Valentine’s Day holiday season. Opt for purchasing the necessary items from your local supermarket and bake a batch of homemade cookies or your significant others favorite dessert.