Tag: Finance tips (page 2 of 2)

Finance Tips for the Holiday Season

The holiday season can get pretty expensive. Starting with candy and costumes for family and neighbors in October, followed by a feast of food in November and all of the gifts, gatherings, and extras around the winter holiday season, bills can really add up. Unfortunately, your wallet may not be able to keep up with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. There are several ways to help you save money while still allowing you to delight in the magic and wonder of the holidays.

Set a budget

It’s easy to spend money when you don’t try to set a cap on how much you’re allowed to spend. Without a budget, you’ll be more likely to overspend. Sit down and work numbers before even setting foot in a store so you know exactly how much you have to spend. On average, people spend around $704 during the holiday season, but that is all dependent on an individual’s personal financial situation.

Do your research

Everyone is going to be advertising that they have the best deal on a specific product during the holiday season. It’s up to you to do your homework and see who’s actually telling the truth. You can comparison shop right from the comfort of your own home by looking up prices online. That way, you’ll know you’re getting the best deal.

Break out your DIY skills

Giving a homemade gift is the perfect way to save money while also expressing how much you care about the recipient. Anyone can go out and buy something from the store, but a homemade gift takes planning, time to make, and a lot of thought. It can also save you a lot of money by making the gift yourself.

Enlist the help of others

If you decide you want to host a holiday gathering, don’t feel like you have to do it all on your own. Most guests expect to bring something to a party—whether it be a dish to pass, a bottle of wine, or even paper products. You’ll be able to throw a great party on a budget that all of your guests will enjoy.

Talk to a financial advisor

If you’re really struggling to keep up with expenses and expectations at the end of the year, it might behoove you to sit down and talk to a financial advisor. Whether you’re dealing with personal finance concerns or family investment issues, a financial advisor can examine all of those complex moving parts and help you develop a plan for keeping the spirit alive during the holidays.

Tips for Financial Independence and Early Retirement

What do you consider to be “retirement age”? Perhaps early 60s or late 50s. What about 30s and 40s? The FIRE movement, which stands for “financial independence, retire early,” has gained traction with individuals as young as their 20s. The idea of working 9-to-5 jobs for several decades is an intimidating one, and FIRE offers the chance to work hard and, earlier than expected, play hard. However, FIRE is not an easy process, and it takes plenty of planning to truly retire early. Here are some considerations to take into account if you plan on retiring early.

Do Your Research

Monthly earnings from social security and pensions, costs of present and future healthcare concerns, and similar factors must be considered before an individual takes any steps towards early retirement. There are several complications, ones that often work against each other, to sort out during the planning phase of FIRE, but these factors help paint a picture of your financial future. Make sure you understand what FIRE really is, and what it means for you and your situation. In some cases, research may prove that early retirement isn’t the best option; rather, switching to part-time work or taking a temporary hiatus from work is better. 

Speak With a Financial Advisor

Financial advisors often assist individuals experiencing drastic life changes, such as making a family or retiring. When it comes to the latter, financial advisors will examine whether a client’s current financial system sets a strong foundation for retirement. Additionally, financial advisors look to the future to predict potential issues. Taking all of this into consideration, clients and advisors can develop a plan to work towards that independence. While hiring a financial advisor does come at a cost, the benefits of receiving an expert’s advice and planning assistance can be a lucrative investment. 

Don’t Rush the Process

A simple Google search can unearth a plethora of FIRE horror stories. A common trend in these tales involves early retirees jumping the gun and retiring before they’ve hit their financial goals. For some, this means retiring several years sooner than planned. While earlier-than-early retirement is enticing, it’s unwise to throw your financial goals out the window. Doing so means deviating from your financial plans, which in turn leads to increased risks of your independence returning to dependence. Remain patient and diligent as you work towards retirement, and avoid making rash decisions to save time—that won’t always equate to saving money.

Understand Your Drive

Why do you want to retire early? Is it to avoid unhealthy amounts of stress? Are you trying to spend more time with your family? Has a hobby become your life-long passion? A thorough understanding of the “why” behind your desire to retire early will help you figure out how to reach your financial goals. Anyone can say they want to have more free time. But what are you going to do with that free time? Take some time to introspect and figure out what drives you towards early retirement. 

Why You’re Overspending (And How to Stop)

Compare your monthly income with your monthly spending. Do you notice a glaring discrepancy? Are your earnings in the red? Can’t figure out how you spent hundreds on groceries? You aren’t alone. Overspending is easy to do, and purchases can accumulate in the blink of an eye. Here are some reasons why you’re overspending and advice on how to stop.

You’ve fallen into a bad habit

Do you buy lunch at the deli down the street every day? This is just one example of a bad spending habit. It may be comfortable and convenient to make a daily or weekly purchase, but ten dollars per day, five days a week, four weeks a month equals $200 each month just for lunch. 

The best way to remedy a bad spending habit is to ease yourself out of the habit. For the lunch example, try packing a meal most days each week, and only go out once a week or so as a special treat. You don’t have to quit anything cold-turkey, and easing yourself towards a better spending habit might inspire you to be more mindful of what you buy.

You ignore automatic payments

This one is easy to notice, especially if you subscribe to magazines and newspapers that clog your mailbox. Still, with the rise of streaming services and other digital subscriptions, you may not be keeping track of all the services you subscribe to. It’s easy to let automatic monthly payments slip through the cracks, but those payments are also an easy way to lose money.

Each month, carefully study your credit card statement. Write down the names of subscriptions you used during the month, whether that means watching a movie on Netflix or flipping through a copy of Sports Illustrated. Next to that list, write down the subscriptions you didn’t use. Unsubscribe from the ones that you didn’t touch. You’d be surprised how much money you can save annually just by paring down your subscriptions.

You haven’t disciplined your spending habits

It’s hard to find someone who hasn’t disciplined their spending habits. Whether you fall victim to impulse buys at the checkout line or fill your gas tank before it hits the halfway mark, everyone has a spending vice. 

No two people have the same income, interests, and habits, which can make disciplining your spending habits difficult. The key is to figure out what you’re buying and why you’re buying it. It helps to break purchases up into categories, such as “loans,” “food,” and “entertainment.” Not only will this show how much you’re spending, but it will also reveal what exactly you’re spending your money on.

3 New Year’s Resolution Ideas to Save You Money

Maybe 2017 was not the best year for you financially. Luckily, you can stop looking at the past and look towards a better financial future in 2018. With the new year brings new goals, and you can make one of those goals focusing on your personal finance or money management.

Invest

A wise way to handle your money would be to invest. As you may have seen recently, Bitcoin has seen a huge rise in their stocks. Although it can be risky, sometimes the investment is worth it in the long run.

Create and Stick to a Budget

Another tip that can really help you with money management is saving your money by formulating a budget. Proper money management is an extremely important finance characteristic to have. Not only is it good to know how to save money for obvious reasons, but it can also be a saving grace for you in case of an emergency.

Impulse buying can be very dangerous. It can lead to you being in insurmountable debt and regretting days if not hours later. Preparing a budget can assist you with saving a great deal of extra cash while steadily maturing in your spending habits.

Save Money By Breaking Bad Habits

A great way to kill two birds with one stone is to save money by breaking bad habits. Create a jar that you will have to place money in each time you perform an action you are trying to quit. Anytime you have an urge to swear, break your diet, or have an urge to smoke a cigarette, put a certain amount of money into your jar. This will help you break free of your bad habits while simultaneously improving your financial situation.

Personal money management and financial woes are something everyone wishes they could live life without, but everybody at one point or another has to conquer. Make sure 2018 is a financially freeing year by trying these New Year’s resolution ideas and see which one works best for you!

3 Ways to Rid Yourself of Student Loan Debt in 2018

Student loan debt affects a huge part of the population. In fact, the overall student loan total in America skyrocketed to over $1.3 trillion in 2017. Fortunately, 2018 yields some promising tools and processes that can help citizens rid themselves of it. Here are three personal finance tips for getting rid of student loan debt:

Choose the Right Occupation

One way to get student loan debt forgiveness is to work for a government entity or a nonprofit organization. Doing so will allow you to become eligible for a forgiveness program after 5-10 years as an employee. Public school teachers who work in low-income neighborhoods are eligible for student loan forgiveness, as well. Therefore, you may want to consider putting in an application in those fields.

Choose a Repayment Plan The Works for You

Another personal finance tip for you is to sign up for a reasonable repayment plan. If you have low income or limited income, you can sign up for for a plan that’s income based or income contingent. Doing so will ease the burden for you as you pay down the debt. Eventually, you’ll make it to financial freedom.

To sign up for the special repayment plans, you just have to visit the website and complete an application. You may have to mail or upload some information so that the debtor can assess your income situation. Once they do that, they will let you know if you qualify for a specialized repayment plan.

Pick up a Second Job

Finally, you could always pick up a second job to pay down your student loans. Many retail stores hire at an accelerated pace during the holiday season. If you have some time to spare, you can put in a few hours every day and use everything that you earn toward those loans.

You deserve to have financial freedom, and you can get it if you handle your loans intelligently. Try these methods and watch your student loans decline in the blink of an eye.

Finance Tips for Small Business Owners

All too often we find ourselves with big dreams of owning our own business without the capital to match. This is by far the most difficult part of building a business from the ground up. Small business owners need to be sure that they are saving enough money to act as an umbrella on a rainy days but they also to need to be sure they have enough funds to purchase materials, advertising, necessary software programs, hire human resources, etc. Needless to say, there is hardly ever enough money to go around at the beginning stages of developing a small business. Here are a few tips that can help.

Credit Reports
Credit is important! That can not be said enough. Maintaining and keeping track of your credit score is essential to the growth of your business. If maintained properly, your credit can help you secure future business and investments.

Cash Management
How is your business going to survive if you don’t have systems in place that allow you to track and monitor the cash flow? You need to be aware of the financial condition of your business at all times and have the ability to identify any possible issues or risks. In order properly manage your cash-flow, you need to be able to:

  • Manage receivable accounts
  • Manage payable accounts
  • Have a crisis management plan prepared
  • Have a financial emergency plan prepared

Be sure to keep accurate records by tracking and monitor all the above mentioned.

Balance Sheet
Your balance sheet is a clear and simple way of reflecting the financial security of your business. Your balance sheet should include:

  • Expenses
  • Available assets and liabilities
  • An acceptable amount of capital to increase assets and reduce liabilities

Many small business owners update their balance sheets daily in the early stages of their business and move to updating it weekly once the business is established.

Welcome to College! Finance Tips for Freshman

The time has finally come! You are off to college and are beginning to experience many of the freedoms that go hand in hand with adulthood -no one telling you what to do, where you have to be, or what to do with your finances. However, as we all know, “with great power comes great responsibility. And how to properly handling finances is one of the greatest lessons you will ever learn.

Balance is key. It will be tough to juggle your schooling, new responsibilities, and financial freedom. So, here are a few tips to help make the transition a little bit easier.

Economics, accounting, investments, oh my!
One of the first steps in learning how to handle your new found financial freedom is to enroll yourself in some sort of finance course at your university. Depending on the knowledge you already possess, you can opt to enroll in a basic finance course or advance. It is suggest that no matter what you already know, you should begin with a basic course. In doing so your memory will be refreshed or you will learn:

Financial principles
Create and balance a budget
How credit card interest works
The best to ways pay off debt
How to be money savvy

These invaluable basic principles will assist you immensely in years to come.

Say NO to credit…for now
It’s difficult to receive those generous credit card offers in the mail and not be tempted to apply. DON’T! Using credit the wrong way will not benefit you in the long run and can possibly damage your credit in the long run. Before you apply for credit cards try:

Living on your own for a minimum of one year
Have experience successfully living within a budget you have set for yourself
Successfully demonstrate financial restraint

Did you say budget?
Yes, now that you are on your own it is essential that you understand how to properly budget your finances. Creating a budget is simple. All you need to do is:

Make not of your net income
Make note of your expenses (including rent, utilities, food, travel, laundry, etc.)
Add a miscellaneous section for recreational activities (movies, dinners, etc)

Pay close attention to your budget to be sure that you do not overspend. The whole point of a budget is to help you save money you do not necessarily have to spend.

The paths of your new found freedoms will take you on the most important journeys of your life. Embrace it all. Do not be afraid. Instead, Do your research and take your time. You are going to be just fine.